Resources

Friends of Darebin Creek videos, links & documents

Photograph copyright Tom Crawshaw 2022

Videos

Friends of Darebin Creek

The friends of Darebin Creek was formed in 1995 to protect, restore and conserve the Darebin Creek and its adjacent parklands as a natural environment for the enjoyment of the community.

Caring for Darebin Creek

Caring for Darebin Creek, a film by James Magree.

South African Weed Orchid (Disa bracteata)

This video features Michael Cincotta from Nangak Tamboree/La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, and Margaret de Kam, President of Friends of Darebin Creek, identifying the South African Weed Orchid. This emerging and attractive weed is becoming a serious threat to Kangaroo Grass (Themeda triandra) dominant grasslands.

Serrated Tussock (Nassella trichotoma)

This video features Michael Cincotta from Nangak Tamboree/La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, and Margaret de Kam, President of Friends of Darebin Creek, identifying another weed in the Weed Watch series. Serrated Tussock, a deep rooted weed can be easily identified by touch, find out how.

Pampas Lily of the Valley (Salpichroa origanifolia)

This video features Michael Cincotta from Nangak Tamboree/La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, and Margaret de Kam, President of Friends of Darebin Creek, identifying another weed in the Weed Watch series. Pampas Lily of the Valley is a scrambling plant capable of smothering small trees and originated in temperate South America.

Narrow leaved Ash (Fraxinus angustifolia)

This video features Michael Cincotta from Nangak Tamboree/La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, and Margaret de Kam, President of Friends of Darebin Creek, identifying another weed in the Darebin Creek Weed Watch series. Narrow leaved Ash, particularly invasive along waterways, has a robust approach to germination.

Greater Periwinkle (Vinca major)

This video features Michael Cincotta from Nangak Tamboree/La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, and Margaret de Kam, President of Friends of Darebin Creek, identifying another weed in the Darebin Creek Weed Watch series. A garden escapee, Greater Periwinkle’s well developed root system smothers native vegetation.

Cruel Vine (Araujia sericifera)

This video features Michael Cincotta from Nangak Tamboree/La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, and Margaret de Kam, President of Friends of Darebin Creek, identifying another weed in the Darebin Creek Weed Watch series. The aptly named Cruel Vine has an interesting approach to pollination.

Bridal Creeper (Asparagus asparagoides)

This video features Michael Cincotta from Nangak Tamboree/La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, and Margaret de Kam, President of Friends of Darebin Creek, identifying another weed in the Darebin Creek Weed Watch series. Bridal Creeper, deceptively delicate, launches a two pronged attack to out compete surrounding vegetation.

Boneseed (Chrysanthemoides monilifera)

This video features Michael Cincotta from Nangak Tamboree/La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, and Margaret de Kam, President of Friends of Darebin Creek, identifying another weed in the Darebin Creek Weed Watch series. Boneseed has vigorous, competitive growth and the ability to regenerate prolifically after fire.

Blackberry (Rubus fruticosus)

This video features Michael Cincotta from Nangak Tamboree/La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, and Margaret de Kam, President of Friends of Darebin Creek, identifying another weed in the Darebin Creek Weed Watch series. Blackberry Rubus, introduced for erosion control, is a vigorous weed that has become common in the broader landscape.

Artichoke Thistle (Cynara cardunculus)

This video features Michael Cincotta from Nangak Tamboree/La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, and Margaret de Kam, President of Friends of Darebin Creek, identifying another weed in the Weed Watch video series. Artichoke Thistle, introduced as fodder for livestock, is now a declared noxious weed.

Links

Darebin Creek Weed Watch

Learn to identify invasive weeds and help care for the creek!

Invasive weeds are one of the greatest threats to the ecological health of the Darebin Creek Valley. The Darebin Creek Weed Watch project has been set up to help combat the spread of ten of the most invasive weeds along the creek.

By learning how to identify invasive weeds along the creek, you can alert land managers to their location, allowing for their prompt control. This helps to conserve the biodiversity values of the Darebin Creek Valley.

Below are links to instructions for using iNaturalist, and current posts for the project, and above are the weed identification videos. These videos will help you confidently identify 10 priority weeds and record and submit them using the iNaturalist application.

Instructions and posts

Citizen Science

Being a frog monitor is easy and fun to do, you don’t need to be a frog expert. You can record frog calls at any river, creek, wetland or any other type of waterway. Size around 95 MB. Free.

This app is a very helpful resource for the field identification of waterbugs. Great for citizen scientists, enthusiasts and freshwater ecologists in the field. There is also lots of other useful information for each Waterbug including size, habitat, movement, confused with and SIGNAL scores..Size around 75 MB. Free.

The Waterwatch data portal allows you to view, query and download Waterwatch data and images for regions in Victoria.

Webinars

An article on the Darebin Creek in The Citizen